BIO - Biology


BIO 105Biology in the Modern WorldUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer, Natural Sciences
Credit is not allowed for BIO 105 and BIO 181 or BIO 125.
Principles and concepts of biology including cellular structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, homeostasis, reproduction, heredity, diversity of life, ecology, evolution and animal behavior. Emphasis on human affairs and human examples. For non-science students. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 105 and (BIO 115 or BIO 181 or BIO 183).


BIO 106Biology in the Modern World LaboratoryUNITS: 1 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer, Natural Sciences
Corequisite: BIO 105
Laboratory experience in biological principles to complement BIO 105. For non-science students. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 106 and (BIO 116, BIO 181 or BIO 183).


BIO 140Survey of Animal DiversityUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only, Natural Sciences
Classification and phylogeny of animals; patterns of diversification in body design and relationship between body design and the environment; study of selected animal assemblages. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 140 and BIO 350 or BIO 402 or BIO 403 or ZO 150.


BIO 141Animal Diversity LaboratoryUNITS: 1 - Offered in Fall Only, Natural Sciences
Prerequisite: BIO 140
Observation of living animals, dissections of preserved specimens, and microscopy; emphasis on classification of animals, patterns of diversification in body design, and relationship between body design and the environment. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 141 and BIO 350 or BIO 402 or BIO 403 or ZO 150.


BIO 165Introduction to Environmental ResearchUNITS: 5 - Offered in Summer, Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Introduction to environmental research is a hands-on learning experience for incoming freshmen interested in pursuing scientific research. The course introduces students to scientific methods and research through active participation in research on an environmental problem involving chemicals of environmental concern. Students will explore a topic in this field through guided readings, field samplings, and lab experimentation. Restricted to incoming freshmen who have been accepted into the HHMI RISE program


BIO 181Introductory Biology: Ecology, Evolution, and BiodiversityUNITS: 4 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer, Natural Sciences
Credit is not allowed for BIO 181 and BIO 105 or BIO 125.
Emphasis on interactions of organisms with their environments, evolutionary change and role of natural selection in the evolution of life forms, biological diversity in the context of form and function of organisms, and on critical thinking, problem solving, and effective communication. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 181 and (BIO 105 or BIO 106 or BIO 115 or BIO 116).


BIO 183Introductory Biology: Cellular and Molecular BiologyUNITS: 4 - Offered in Fall and Spring, Natural Sciences
Prerequisite: BIO 181 or CH 101
Basic concepts and principles of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Emphasis will be on the physical basis of life, the cell as the fundamental unit of life, the mechanisms involved in the development of multicellular organisms and on critical thinking, problem solving, experimental design, and effective communication. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 183 and (BIO 105 or BIO 106 or BIO 115 or BIO 116).


BIO 212Basic Human Anatomy and PhysiologyUNITS: 4 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer, Natural Sciences
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183
Major emphasis on structure and function of the muscular, skeletal, circulatory and nervous systems of humans. Credit in both BIO 212 and BIO 301 or BIO 302 is not allowed.


BIO (MEA) 220Marine BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only, Natural Sciences
Prerequisite: MEA 200 or BIO 181
Introduction to marine plants and animals, their adaptations to life in the sea and ecological interactions in selected marine environments (e.g. coral reefs, deep sea, salt marshes). Interactions of man with the sea: food from the seas, biology of diving. Optional trip.


BIO 227Understanding Structural Diversity through Biological IllustrationUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only, Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Natural Sciences
Biological concepts of diversity and anatomy taught through direct observation and illustrative techniques. Lecture topics include plant ID and structure, microscopic life forms, animal anatomy and identification. Laboratory work emphasizes close observation of structures and comparative anatomy as well as illustrative techniques to produce accurate drawings of specimens. Students will be required to provide their own transportation for one field trip.


BIO 233Human-Animal InteractionsUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall and Summer, Interdisciplinary Perspectives
This course is designed to explore the relationship humans share with other animals and nature. We will study the early history of animal domestication and the influence of animals on human culture and religion. We will also explore our relationships to animals as pets, food, research subjects, and wildlife. All subjects will be covered through interaction with quest speaker, assigned readings, case studies, and class discussion.


BIO 250Animal Anatomy and PhysiologyUNITS: 4 - Offered in Fall Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183
Roles of physical laws, environmental challenges, and evolutionary history in shaping animal structure and function. Selected examples from invertebrates and vertebrates. Laboratory in anatomy and physiology, hypothesis generation and testing and data analysis and presentation.


BIO 267Research in the Life Sciences I: Research SkillsUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 and Corequisite: BIO 183
This course is designed to help first year students learn basic skills associated with scientific research. Class structure is interactive and relies on group collaboration for most projects. Students will become confident in reading and analyzing scientific literature, communicating scientific principles, compiling a poster presentation, presenting at scientific conferences, and attending local scientific symposia as well as practicing some basic laboratory techniques. The 2-semester Research PackTrack Program (BIO 267 and 269) is designed to prepare undergraduates for an original research experience in a scientific laboratory. A B- or better in BIO 267 is required to take BIO 269. Students in BIO 267 are required to attending one research symposium outside of regular class time.


BIO 269Research in the Life Sciences II: Guided ResearchUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183 and B- or better in BIO 267
This course is designed to provide students with a laboratory framework for conducting original research and (together with BIO 267) preparation to move on to conducting research in a scientific laboratory. Students will explore the binding characteristics of bacterially-expressed estrogen receptor genes by generating their own research goals, writing research proposals, conducting original independent research, and presenting their findings in at least one poster symposium. This course is the second part of the Research PackTrack program, and students in this course will have earned a B- or better in the first course (BIO 267).


BIO 295Special Topics in BiologyUNITS: 0-4
Experimental offerings in Biology.


BIO 315General ParasitologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 and BIO 183
General principles of parasitic symbiosis. Emphasis on life cycles, epidemiology, and pathology of major parasites of humans and domestic animals.


BIO 317Primate Ecology and EvolutionUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 & BIO 183, and one of the following courses: ANT 251, BIO 212, BIO 250, BIO/PB 330, BIO 350, BIO/PB 360, BIO 410 , BIO 422, BIO 424, or BIO 488
A comprehensive survey of the behavior, evolution, and ecology of nonhuman primates. Special emphasis will be placed in the evolution of cognitive abilities, social systems, and behavioral patterns that are unique to primates, including the evolution of language. Topics include primate taxonomy, evolution of the extant primates, geographic distribution, social behavior, reproductive behavior and strategies, parental behavior, communication, and cognitive. Classes will consist of interactive lectures, films, and class discussions.


BIO (PB) 330Evolutionary BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181and BIO 183
Principles and patterns of organic evolution. Topics will include the origin of life, patterns of genetic variation, adaptations, natural selection, and the formation of species, the relationship between micro and macroevolution, and the importance of evolution to humans and medicine.


BIO 333Captive Animal BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 and one of the following (BIO 140 or 250 or 260 or 350 or NTR 301 or ANS 150 or 205 or GN 311)
This course serves to introduce interested students to historical and current captive animal conservation efforts. We will discuss in detail a variety of issues essential to the management of wild animals in a captive setting including ethics, nutrition, reproduction, behavior, and population management.


BIO 350Animal Phylogeny and DiversityUNITS: 4 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in BIO 181 and sophomore standing. Credit is not allowed for both BIO 350 and BIO 402/403
Phylogenetic history and adaptive radiation of animals; contrast of environmental determinants of biodiversity in tropical and polar regions; modern approaches to phylogeny; role of humans in influencing biodiversity. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 350 and BIO 140 or ZO 150 or BIO 402 or BIO 403.


BIO (FW) 353Wildlife ManagementUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only
Prerequisite:BIO 181
Historical development of Wildlife Management from anecdotal, observational practices to modern, scientific approaches used around the world. Principles of population analysis, management, protection and conservation of animals, particularly those of conservation, aesthetic, sport or food values in urban, rural and wilderness areas. Ethics of hunting and trapping. Contradictory objectives challenging modern wildlife managers.


BIO (PB) 360EcologyUNITS: 4 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181
The science of ecology, including factors which control distribution and population dynamics of organisms, structure and function of biological communities, and energy flow and nutrient cycling in ecosystems; contrasts among the major biomes; and principles governing ecological responses to global climatic and other environmental changes.


BIO 361Developmental BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183
In this course students will discover the amazing journey that cells must take to get from an egg to an embryo, form a mature adult, and reproduce in order to continue the life cycle. Students will relate science to everyday life using developmental biology as a forum to integrate many aspects of biology from the molecules in single cells to the complete organism and how it is influenced by evolution and the environment.


BIO 370Developmental Anatomy of the VertebratesUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 or BIO 140
An integrated study of the functional anatomy, phylogeny, and embryonic development of organ systems in vertebrate animals.


BIO 375Developmental Anatomy LaboratoryUNITS: 2 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 or BIO 140
A hands-on study of embryonic development and organ systems in vertebrate animals, utilizing microscopic examination of living and preserved embryos, demonstrations of skeletons and mammalian organs, and dissections of preserved shark, salamander, and mink.


BIO 402Invertebrate BiologyUNITS: 4 - Offered in Fall Only
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in BIO 181 and BIO 183. Credit is not allowed for both BIO 350 and BIO 402/403.
Over 90% of all animals are invertebrates, and many invertebrate species have proven extremely useful in medical and research applications. This course will survey invertebrate groups or clades (excluding the Protista), and will emphasize their functional biology, phylogeny, ecology, behavior, and use as models in research. Lab will emphasize an experimental approach and will involve work primarily with live material. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 402 and BIO 350 or BIO 140.


BIO 405Functional HistologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Summer
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183
Offered only as a distance education course via the internet. Functional Histology describes the cellular structure of tissues and organs. Human organs are emphasized, with brief consideration given to variation in other mammals. Tissue and organ structure is related to function, including examples of malfunction (histopathology). The course is especially appropriate for students planning a career in veterinary science, medicine, or allied health fields. Offered by distance education only.


BIO 410Introduction to Animal BehaviorUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181and BIO 183
Studies in animal behavior in vertebrates and invertebrates, focusing on the mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. Topics include neural, hormonal, and genetic bases of behavior; foraging; anti-predator defenses; mating systems and sexual selection; social behavior; communication; parental care; territoriality and habitat selection.


BIO (PB) 414Cell BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183 and CH 221
The chemical and physical bases of cellular structure and function with emphasis on methods and interpretations.


BIO 421Advanced Human Anatomy and PhysiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 250 or BIO 212
A comprehensive survey of the processes involved in the function of specialized cells, tissues and organ systems. Emphasis on basic concepts with orientation toward mammalian and human systems.


BIO 422Biological ClocksUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 250 or BIO 212
The anatomy, physiology, and development of biological clocks in a variety of organisms, including humans. Credit in both BIO 422 and ZO 522 is not allowed.


BIO 424EndocrinologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 250 or BIO 212
This course will explore the function of hormones and bioactive compounds in regulating animal physiology and homeostasis. Topics will include a study of hormones and their mechanism of actions in regulating various biological processes including development and growth; reproduction; feeding, digestion and metabolism; ion and water balance; stress and immunity; and sex determination. The methods used to study hormones and their physiological functions will also be addressed. 80% of enrollment is restricted to Biological Sciences and Zoology students with the remaning 20% open for all other majors.


BIO (ENT) 425General EntomologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall and Summer, Natural Sciences
Prerequisite: BIO 181 or BIO 140 or ZO 150 or BIO 350
Explores the science of entomology by focusing on the basic principles of systematics, morphology, physiology, development, behavior, ecology, and control of insects. Field trips provide opportunities to collect insects and study their adaptations to a wide variety of natural environments.


BIO 426Advanced Human Anatomy & Physiology LabUNITS: 1 - Offered in Fall and Spring
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 212 or BIO 250; Corequisite: BIO 421
A comprehensive laboratory course surveying the process involved in the function and structure of specialized cells, tissues, and organ systems. Emphasis will be on problem solving and critical thinking skills.


BIO (FW) 430Fisheries and Wildlife AdministrationUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: PS 201, PS 202; FW/BIO 420, FW/BIO 353
Describes and compares the administrative structures and programs of federal and state fish and wildlife agencies and develops an understanding of the basis on which these agencies function. Evaluates the interrelationships that fisheries-wildlife professionals, special interest groups, public agencies and legislative bodies play in resource management programs.


BIO 434Hormones and BehaviorUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only, Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite:C- or better in BIO 212 or Bio 250 or (ANS 205 & ANS 206)
This course will focus on the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, which explores mechanisms by which hormones affect and are affected by behavior. The course will use highly interactive lectures and discussions of material from the primary literature (seminal papers and recent exciting contributions). Student participation in class discussions and in-class assignments will be critical components of the learning process.


BIO 440The Human Animal: An Evolutionary PerspectiveUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in one of the following: BIO 317, BIO/PB 330, BIO 410, PSY 406, or PSY 416
An in-depth look at the evolution of a wide range of human behaviors, and some aspects of physiology as well. We will critically explore the perceptions we hold of ourselves and the research that has sought to lend new insights into the fundamental bases of human behavior. New uses of evolutionary theory, including the field of evolutionary psychology, will be examined using a comparative approach and careful readings from primary and secondary literature in evolutionary biology and psychology. Classes will be largely discussion based.


BIO (MEA) 449Principles of Biological OceanographyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only
Biological productivity and trophic relationships in plankton, nekton and benthos; community ecology of selected habitats (estuaries, intertidal zones, coral reefs, deep sea); and adaptation of organisms to the marine environment. Credit is not allowed for both MEA/BIO 449 and MEA/BIO 549


BIO 460Field Ecology and MethodsUNITS: 4
Prerequisite: C- or better in ST 311 and BIO 360
Field Ecology and Methods will expose senior students with interests in Ecology and Evolution to the diverse field approaches used to address ecological questions. The course considers and implements a variety of field approaches ranging from microcosm experiments to global studies of patterns and diversity. Course is restricted to seniors.


BIO 482Capstone Course in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall and Spring
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 361, BIO/PB 414, and one of the following: BCH 351 or BCH 451 or BIT 410 or GN 311.
Topical problems in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. BIO 482 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and on effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the MCD curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.


BIO 483Capstone Course in Integrative Physiology and NeurobiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall and Spring
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 424, BIO 488, and one of the following: BIO/PB 414 or BCH 351 or BCH 451 or GN 311 or ST 311.
Topical problems in integrative physiology and neurobiology. BIO 483 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and on effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the IPN curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.


BIO 484Capstone Course in Human BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall and Spring
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 421, MB 351 and one of the following: BCH 351 or BCH 451 or GN 311 or ST 311.
Topical problems in human biology. BIO 484 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and on effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the HB curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.


BIO 485Capstone Course in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall and Spring
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO/PB 330, BIO/PB 360, and one of the following: BIO 460 or GN 311 or NR 406 or ST 311.
Topical problems in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. BIO 485 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and on effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the EEC curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.


BIO 486Capstone Course in ZoologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall and Spring
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 250, BIO/PB 360, and one of the following: BIO 350 or BIO 402/403 or GN 311 or ST 311.
Topical problems in zoology. BIO 486 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the SZO curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.


BIO 488NeurobiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only
Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 250 or BIO 212
Overview of the neurosciences, with a focus on fundamental principles in the function, structure, and development of the nervous system. Topics include neuroanatomy, electrical signaling, synaptic transmission, sensory and motor systems, neural development, neural plasticity, and complex brain functions. Multiple levels of analysis, from molecular to behavioral, with an emphasis on the mammalian nervous system.


BIO 492External Learning ExperienceUNITS: 1-6 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Learning experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework with facilities and resources external to the campus. Contact and arrangements with prospective supervisors by the student. Prior approval by faculty advisor, prospective supervisor, and departmental teaching coordinator.


BIO 493Special Problems in Biological SciencesUNITS: 1-6 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Learning experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework with campus facilities and resources. Contact and arrangements with prospective supervisors by the student. Prior approval by faculty advisor, prospective supervisor, and department teaching coordinator.


BIO 495Special Topics in BiologyUNITS: 1-6 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer
Individualized study, under faculty supervision, of biological topics, and developmental course on a trial basis.


BIO 498Honors Project Part IUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer
Together, BIO 498 and BIO 499 provide a two-semester sequence for honors projects conducted by students in good standing in an honors program within the Department of Biological Sciences. Before enrollment in BIO 498, students (1) identify a project in consultation with a faculty member, (2) work with that mentor to complete a contract describing the expectations for their work together in BIO 498, and (3) have the contract approved by the honors program coordinator. The approved contract will describe the specific requirements and expectations of the BIO 498 experience. Enrollment only by permission of the honors program director.


BIO 499Honors Project Part 2UNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Spring Summer
Prerequisite: BIO 498
Together, BIO 498 and BIO 499 provide a two-semester sequence for honors projects by students in good standing in an honors program within the Department of Biological Sciences. Before beginning BIO 499, students will have successfully completed BIO 498 as well as a contract describing the expectations for their work with the mentor in BIO 499. The contract must be approved by the honors program director. The approved contract will describe the specific requirements and expectations of the BIO 499 experience. Enrollment only by permission of honors program director.


BIO (ZO) 518Experience and the BrainUNITS: 3
Prerequisite: BIO 488 or ZO 588
This seminar considers how an individual's behavioral interactions with the world (i.e., experience) can alter the structure and/or function of the adult brain. Emphasis will be on reading and critically discussing the primary research literature.


BIO (BMA) 560Population EcologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Spring Only, Offered Alternate Odd Years
Co-requisite: ST 511
Dynamics of natural populations. Current work, theories and problems dealing with population growth, fluctuation, limitation and patterns of dispersion, species interactions, community structure and ecological genetics. One semester of calculus and a junior/senior level ecology course are required.


BIO 561Conservation BiologyUNITS: 3 - Offered in Fall Only, Offered Alternate Odd Years
Conservation Biology applies principles from ecology, genetics, and other biological disciplines to the conservation of biological diversity. This course will train students in techniques in population ecology such as population viability analysis; community ecology and theories of biodiversity; and reserve selection algorithms. The class will examine threats to biodiversity such as habitat fragmentation and loss, climate change, and invasion by exotic species. These issues will be considered within the context of economoic, social, and legal constraints. Graduate status or permission of instructor.