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Spring 2011 Graduating Seniors'
Future Plans Survey
All Respondents: Overview


This overview report presents findings from all graduating seniors participating in the Spring 2011 Graduating Seniors' Future Plans Survey. For more information about the survey methods and analysis, see "Spring 2011 Graduating Seniors' Future Plans Survey: Introduction, Research Methods, and Response Rates." For a report with responses broken down by college, as well as a copy of the question wording, see the "Table of Contents."

Plans Following Graduation
Post-Graduation Employment
Further Education
NC State Experiences and Resources
Closing Comments

Plans Following Graduation

As of the time they completed the survey, a plurality of students graduating in Spring 2011 indicated that they had secured some type of employment. One-fourth of all respondents reported that they had accepted a position that would begin after graduation (24%), 8 percent said they would continue working in a job they had prior to graduation, and about 5 percent said they would be starting their own business (1%), serving in the military (1%), or working as an intern (4%). The large majority of these employed graduates said they would be working full- rather than part-time (84% vs 16%) One-fourth of the graduates said they were actively seeking employment but had not yet found a position (26%). Just 2 percent said they were planning on looking for work but had not yet begun to do so. Finally, one-fourth of respondents anticipated going to graduate/professional school as their primary activity in the year after their graduation (19%) or going to graduate/professional school and working (7%).

Table 1: Plans Following Graduation
N %
Have accepted position that will begin after graduation 461 24.3
Will continue working in job I had prior to graduation 158 8.3
Have started/will be starting my own business 22 1.2
Will be working as an intern 76 4.0
Currently seeking employment 492 26.0
Have not begun to seek employment, will begin within year 45 2.4
Going to grad/prof school within the year 357 18.8
Going to grad/prof school and working 126 6.6
Taking additional undergraduate coursework 23 1.2
Military service 22 1.2
Volunteer activity 19 1.0
Starting/raising a family 9 0.5
Don't know yet 20 1.1
Other 65 3.4

Post-Graduate Employment

About 40 percent of respondents said they had secured employment for after graduation. This section of the report first provides detailed information specifically on those students who indicated they had obtained a full-time position. That is followed by information provided by those who said they were actively seeking employment but had not yet found a position, and lastly, a brief look at those who said they had not yet begun their job search.

Full-Time Employment
Almost 85 percent of respondents who said they had secured employment for after graduation indicated they would be working full-time.

Table 2: Full- or Part-Time Employment (among those securing any type of employment)
N %
Full-time 729 83.5
Part-time 144 16.5

Number of Job Offers
Half of the students having secured a full-time position said that had been their only job offer (51%). A relatively small number of respondents indicated that they had had three or more job offers from which to choose.

Table 3: Number of Job Offers
N %
Yes: This was my only job offer 335 50.9
No: I had one other job offer 214 32.5
No: I had two other job offers 69 10.5
No: I had three or more other offers 40 6.1

Industry and Occupation
Students having obtained full-time employment were asked to select the type of industry and the occupational classification of the job in which they would be working from a list industries and occupations identified by the U.S. Census. Although the graduates are heading into a wide range of industries, the most common industry in which they will be working is professional, scientific, and technical services (14%), followed by manufacturing (10%) and finance and insurance (10%).

Those finding full-time employment were most likely to say they would be working in an occupation related to architecture and engineering (12%), followed by business and financial operations (11%), sales (10%), and computer and mathematics (9%).

For a complete list of the companies/organizations where graduates obtained full-time employment, click here.

Table 4: Industry
N %
Accommodation and Food Services 11 1.6
Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services 6 0.8
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, and Hunting 17 2.4
Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 20 2.8
Construction 21 3.0
Educational Services 39 5.5
Finance and Insurance 72 10.2
Health Care and Social Assistance 49 6.9
Information 30 4.2
Management of Companies and Enterprises 32 4.5
Manufacturing 71 10.0
Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction 2 0.3
Other Services (except Public Administration) 22 3.1
Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 97 13.7
Public Administration 3 0.4
Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 7 1.0
Retail Trade 33 4.7
Transportation and Warehousing 7 1.0
Utilities 20 2.8
Wholesale Trade 2 0.3
Other 135 19.1
Not sure 12 1.7

Table 5: Occupational Classification
N %
Architecture and Engineering Occupations 83 11.8
Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations 26 3.7
Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Occupations 2 0.3
Business and Financial Operations Occupations 79 11.2
Community and Social Service Occupations 11 1.6
Computer and Mathematical Occupations 64 9.1
Construction and Extraction Occupations 12 1.7
Education, Training, and Library Occupations 28 4.0
Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations 9 1.3
Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations 8 1.1
Health Care Practitioners and Technical Occupations 21 3.0
Health Care Support Occupations 13 1.8
Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations 10 1.4
Legal Occupations 7 1.0
Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations 26 3.7
Management Occupations 43 6.1
Military Specific Occupations 22 3.1
Office and Administrative Support Occupations 30 4.3
Personal Care and Service Occupations 4 0.6
Production Occupations 24 3.4
Protective Service Occupations 2 0.3
Sales and Related Occupations 72 10.2
Transportation and Material Moving Occupations 4 0.6
Other 90 12.8
Not sure 15 2.1

Relationship of Job to Academic Major & Satisfaction with Job
While 60 percent of those with full-time employment said their job was directly related to their academic major, one-in-ten said that it was not at all related. The vast majority of those obtaining full-time employment said they were either very satisfied (56%) or satisfied (33%) with the job in which they would be working. Students obtaining positions more directly related to their major, however, were more likely to be very satisfied than were those getting jobs less directly related to their major .

Table 6: Relationship of Job to Major & Satisfaction with Job
Relationship of job to major Satisfaction w/ job All
Very Satisfied Satisfied
Neutral
Dissatisfied
Very Dissatisfied
Directly related (n=429) 62.2% 31.2% 6.5% . . 61.0%
Somewhat related (n=210) 46.2% 40.0% 10.0% 3.3% 0.5% 29.9%
Not at all related (n=64) 43.8% 23.4% 25.0% 4.7% 3.1% 9.1%
All (n=703) 55.8% 33.1% 9.2% 1.4% 0.4% 100.0%

Job Location
A small number of graduates with full-time employment will be working outside the U.S. (2%). While NC State graduates will be employed across the nation, 72 percent of those students having accepted a full-time job say they will be working in North Carolina. Fairly large contingents of graduates will be working in Virginia, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, New York, and Illinois. Altogether, 55 percent of the Spring 2011 graduates finding full-time employment will be staying in the Triangle. For a complete list of the countries and states in which graduates will be working, click here.

Table 7 Job Location (most common states)
N %
North Carolina 499 72.2
Virginia 23 3.3
South Carolina 18 2.6
Florida 12 1.7
Georgia 12 1.7
New York 12 1.7
Illinois 10 1.4

Table 8: Job Location (In or Our of the Triangle)*
N %
Triangle 360 54.9
Other NC 130 19.8
Outside NC 166 25.3
*Some respondents did not provide the name of the city in which they would be working.

Compensation
Students with full-time positions were asked to indicate the different ways in which they would be compensated. While two-thirds said they would be getting a salary, and 27 percent said their income would include hourly wages, results indicate that graduates are being compensated through a variety of methods. For example, plurality of 44 percent will be getting only a salary, 14 percent a salary plus bonuses, 2 percent salary plus commission, and 4 percent salary plus commission and performance bonuses.

Respondents were asked to indicate their annual starting salary, and then, if applicable, their estimated first-year income from performance bonuses and commission. NC State's graduates with full-time employment report an average annual starting salary of $46,531, and an estimated average annual income of almost $25,000 from performance bonuses and/or commission. Combining all forms of reported compensation (excluding hourly wages) brings their average income to $51,734, with one-third earning $60,000 or more their first year and 12 percent earning less than $30,000. Those getting paid an hourly rate report earning, on average, $14.52 per hour.

(Note: Despite instructions asking respondents to exclude their salary from performance bonuses and/or commission, it is possible that a few respondents combined all sources of income in their reported bonuses/commission income. As such, reports below on performance bonus/commission and total income may be slightly higher than is actually the case.)

Table 9: Type of Compensation*
N %
Salary 480 65.8
Hourly 199 27.3
Performance Bonuses 155 21.3
Commission 62 8.5
Other 53 7.3
*Respondents could indicate more than one type of compensation.

Table 10: Type of Compensatino, Combined
N %
Salary only 313 44.1
Hourly only 159 22.4
Salary plus perf. bonuses 96 13.5
Salary plus comm. and perf. bonuses 26 3.7
Salary plus commission 15 2.1
Hourly plus perf. bonuses 14 2.0
Commission only 9 1.3
Performance bonuses only 2 0.3
Other combinations 45 6.3
Other comp. only 31 4.4

Table 11: Annual Starting Salary
(Average salary = $46,521) N %
Less than $30,000 57 12.3
$30,000 - $39,999 99 21.3
$40,000 - $49,999 73 15.7
$50,000 - $59,999 108 23.3
$60,000 or more 96 20.7
Would prefer not answer 18 3.9
Not sure 13 2.8

Table 12: Estimated 1st-Year Income from Performance Bonuses and/or Commission
(Average income = $24,946) N %
Less than $2,500 27 14.8
$2,500 - $4,999 23 12.6
$5,000 - $9,999 20 11.0
$10,000 - $19,999 13 7.1
$20,000 - $49,999 49 26.9
$50,000 or more 29 15.9
Would prefer not answer 9 4.9
Not sure 12 6.6

Table 13: Total Combined 1st-Year Compensation (salary plus performance bonuses and commission)
(Average income = $51,734) N %
Less than $30,000 58 12.4
$30,000 - $39,999 89 19.1
$40,000 - $49,999 71 15.2
$50,000 - $59,999 94 20.1
$60,000 or more 155 33.2

Table 14: Hourly Wages
Average Minimum Maximum N
$14.52 $2.19 $36.00 174

One-Time Compensation
More than one-in-ten of those with full-time employment said they had received a signing bonus (13%), with more than half of them receiving $5,000 or more. Almost 20 percent of those getting a signing bonus said it was for $10,000 or more (18%).

When asked if they were offered a relocation package, half of the students with full-time jobs said that such a package was 'not applicable,' presumably primarily because they were not relocating any substantial distance for their job. However, 22 percent of all those with full-time employment - - or 45 percent of those not saying 'not applicable' - - said they were offered a relocation package.

Table 15: Signing Bonus
N %
Yes 81 12.6
No 562 87.4

Table 16: Amount of Signing Bonus
N %
Less than $500 2 2.5
$500 to $999 4 4.9
$1,000 to $1,999 11 13.6
$2,000 to $2,999 9 11.1
$3,000 to $3,999 7 8.6
$4,000 to $4,999 3 3.7
$5,000 to $5,999 19 23.5
$6,000 to $6,999 4 4.9
$7,000 to $7,999 2 2.5
$8,000 to $8,999 1 1.2
$10,000 or more 15 18.5
Would prefer not answer 4 4.9

Table 17: Relocation Package
N %
Yes 160 22.5
No 194 27.2
Not applicable 358 50.3

The Job Search
Twenty percent of respondents who had obtained a full-time position for after graduation said they began actively looking for a job 12 or more months before graduating in May. Less than 10 percent said they started their job search just within two months of graduation (9%).

Students were asked to indicate what resources had proved to be helpful in their job search. Those with full-time employment were most likely to say that an internship had been helpful (29%), followed by applying for a job via ePACK (25%), attending a career fair at NC State (24%), the University or college career center (23%), personal connections within the company (22%), and/or networking with family/friends/classmates/co-workers (22%).

Table 18: When Started Looking for a Job
N %
12 or more months before graduation 126 19.6
9-11 months before graduation 113 17.6
6-8 months before graduation 178 27.7
3-5 months before graduation 167 26.0
1-2 months before graduation 40 6.2
Less than one month before graduation 18 2.8

Table 19: Helpful Resources*
N %
Internship 210 28.8
Applied for job via ePACK 180 24.7
Career fair at NC State 177 24.3
Campus or college career center 168 23.0
Personal connection(s) within the company 161 22.1
Family/friends/classmates/co-workers 161 22.1
On-campus interviewing 115 15.8
Internet 102 14.0
Employer found resume via ePACK 64 8.8
Faculty member or found job listing in an NC State dept 59 8.1
Consultation with Career Counselor/Coach at NC State 57 7.8
Co-op experience 57 7.8
Employer information session on campus 35 4.8
Professional society 34 4.7
Staffing agency 16 2.2
Career fair off-campus 11 1.5
Other 60 8.2
*Respondents could select more than one option.

Seeking Employment
One-in-four respondents to the Graduating Seniors' Future Plans Survey indicated that as of the time they completed the survey they were currently seeking employment, and a small number (2%) said they had not yet begun to seek employment but that they planned to do so within a year after graduation. This section of the report first looks at those who were activitely seeking a job, and then briefly at those who had not yet begun their job search.

The Job Search
The majority of students who said they were looking but had not yet found a job as of the time they completed the survey - - typically within two weeks before or after graduation - - said they first started looking for a job less than 6 months before their graduation. Fifteen percent of those without a job said they began their search less than one month prior to graduation, 25 percent said they started looking one to two months prior to graduation, and one-third said they started three to five months before graduation (32%).

A sizeable number of Spring 2011 graduates who had been seeking but not yet found employment indicated that it was not due to lack of offers. Sixteen percent said that they had actually received a job offer and 5 percent had received two or more offers. These students were asked to briefly describe why the job offer(s) they had received had not worked out. While some respondents indicated they were still in the process of considering the position, the majority gave a variety of reasons for not accepting the job offer. Jobs not being a good fit with one's career goals and/or their educational background were common reasons offered, as well as job location, compensation (e.g., salary too low or being solely based on commission), and not liking the company/organization. Less frequently mentioned was that the timing of the start-date was not going to work out, not wanting to travel extensively as part of the job, and a job offer being rescinded due to budget cuts.

Table 20: When Started Looking for a Job (among those seeking but not yet securing a job)
N %
12 or more months before graduation 22 4.6
9-11 months before graduation 26 5.4
6-8 months before graduation 85 17.6
3-5 months before graduation 155 32.1
1-2 months before graduation 121 25.1
Less than one month before graduation 74 15.3

Table 21: Received any job offers (among those seeking but not yet securing a job)
N %
No 389 79.2
Yes: one 77 15.7
Yes: two 18 3.7
Yes: three or more 7 1.4

Type of Work Seeking
The large majority of job-seekers are looking for full-time work (90%), with the remainder indicating they were looking for either full- or part-time work. Over 90 percent of those seeking employment said they were were looking for a job either directly (40%) or somewhat (52%) related to their major. The most common occupations in which students were hoping to be employed were architecture and engineering (18%), business and financial operations (15%), and education, training and library (12%).

Table 22: Looking for full-time or part-time work
N %
Full-time 441 89.6
Part-time 3 0.6
Either 48 9.8

Table 23: Relationship of Job Seeking to Major
N %
Looking for position directly related to my major 197 40.0
Looking for position somewhat related to my major 254 51.6
Looking for position unrelated to my major 9 1.8
How closely position is related to major is irrelevant 32 6.5

Table 24: Occupational Classification of Job Seeking
N %
Architecture and Engineering Occupations 88 18.1
Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations 38 7.8
Business and Financial Operations Occupations 74 15.2
Community and Social Service Occupations 12 2.5
Computer and Mathematical Occupations 15 3.1
Construction and Extraction Occupations 7 1.4
Education, Training, and Library Occupations 58 11.9
Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations 5 1.0
Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations 1 0.2
Health Care Practitioners and Technical Occupations 11 2.3
Health Care Support Occupations 10 2.1
Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations 1 0.2
Legal Occupations 4 0.8
Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations 34 7.0
Management Occupations 28 5.7
Office and Administrative Support Occupations 12 2.5
Personal Care and Service Occupations 2 0.4
Production Occupations 5 1.0
Protective Service Occupations 3 0.6
Sales and Related Occupations 15 3.1
Transportation and Material Moving Occupations 4 0.8
Other 40 8.2
Not sure 20 4.1

Location of Job Seeking
Eightly percent of those looking for a job said they were looking only in the United States, while 20 percent said they were looking both inside and outside the U.S.. Relatively few respondents said they were only looking for work outside of North Carolina (6%), while close to half (47%) said they were only looking in North Carolina.

Table 25: Looking for Employment Inside or Outside the U.S.
N %
United States 389 79.1
Outside U.S. 3 0.6
Both 100 20.3

Table 26: Looking for Employment Inside or Outside the N.C.
N %
N.C. only 181 46.6
Only outside N.C. 23 5.9
Both 184 47.4

Future Job Seekers
A very small number of Spring 2011 graduates -- 2 percent - - said that while they had not yet begun their search for employment their primary activity after graduation would be to find a job. In response to a question asking those respondents when they planned to start looking the majority said within the next couple of weeks (42%) or within a month after graduation (28%).

Table 27: When Will Begin Job Search
N %
Within the next couple of weeks 18 41.9
Within a month after graduation 12 27.9
Within 2-3 months after graduation 8 18.6
Within 4-6 months after graduation 2 4.7
Within 6-12 months after graduation 3 7.0

Further Education

This section of the report provides detailed information on further education being pursued by NC State Spring 2011 graduates. One-fourth of the 1,895 graduating seniors who submitted the Future Plans Survey said that they planned on going to graduate or professional school in the coming year. Students planning on attending graduate/professional school were asked to indicate from a list of options the reasons why they had decided to pursue post-graduate education. The most common reason cited was that the student wants to enhance my knowledge in a particular subject area (68%). Half or more also said that my chosen career field requires graduate/professional school (61%), that they will be able to earn a higher salary with an advanced degree (58%), and that they want to improve my marketability (50%). Just 7 percent indicated that being unable to find a job was a reason for attending graduate/professional school.

Table 28: Reasons for Attending Graduate/Professional School*
N %
I want to enhance my knowledge in a particular subject area 316 67.7
My chosen career field requires graduate/professional school 283 60.6
I will be able to earn a higher salary with an advanced degree 270 57.8
I want to improve my marketability 232 49.7
I have been unable to find a job 33 7.1
My employer is encouraging me to attend 12 2.6
Other 26 5.6
*Respondents could select more than one option.

Current Status for Graduate/Professional School Attendence
Of those students planning on attending graduate/professional school, 76 percent say they have have been accepted and know where they are going, and another 7 percent have have been accepted but are unsure where or whether they will be attending. A similar number (6%) said they had applied to school but have not yet been accepted, and 11 percent said had not yet applied but were planning on doing so within the next year. The remainder of this section reports on only those who indicated they have been accepted and definitely know where they will be attending graduate/professional school.

Table 29: Current Status for Graduation/Professional School Attendence
N %
Have been accepted and know where I'm going 356 76.2
Have not applied but plan to do so within the next year 50 10.7
Have been accepted but undecided 33 7.1
Have applied, but not yet been accepted 28 6.0

School Attending
Students were most likely to say they would be attending graduate/professional school in North Carolina (70%), with almost half of all those pursuing further education saying they will be staying at NC State (47%). Almost 85 percent of those who have been accepted to graduate/professional school and know where they will be attending say they are going to their first-choice school. For a complete list of the graduate/professional schools graduates will be attending click here.

Table 30: State of School Attending (4 most commonly mentioned)
N %
North Carolina 250 70.4
Virginia 14 3.9
Florida 10 2.8
New York 10 2.8

Table 31: Name of School Attending (3 most commonly mentioned)
N %
NC State Univ. 167 47.4
UNC Chapel Hill 19 5.4
East Carolina Univ. 14 4.0

Table 32: Attending First Choice School?
N %
Yes 296 83.6
No 58 16.4

Degree Seeking
Students attending graduate/professional school in the coming year were asked in what degree program they will be enrolled. The majority of students said they would be in a Master's program (64%), while 15 percent will be enrolled in a doctoral program. Twenty percent will be attending professional school. Among those attending professional school a plurality will be will be enrolled in law school (30%). Other professional degrees NC State graduates will be pursuing include DVM (20%), MD (16%), and PharmD (14%). For a complete list of the specific types of degrees programs in which students will be enrolled click here.

Table 33: Degree Program Enrolled In
N %
Master's 229 64.3
Doctoral 55 15.4
Professional 72 20.2

Table 34: Professional Degree Program Enrolled In
N %
JD 22 29.7
DVM 15 20.3
MD 12 16.2
PharmD 10 13.5

Graduate/Professional School Funding/Awards Received*
NC State undergraduates going on to graduate/professional school received a variety of funding and/or awards as part of their acceptance into their program. Scholarships were most commonly reported (22%), followed by Research Assistantships (14%) and Teaching Assistantships (14%).

Table 35: Graduate/Professional School Funding/Awards
N %
Scholarship 78 21.9
Research Assistantship 51 14.3
Teaching Assistantship 50 14.0
Fellowship 33 9.3
Honors/Award 21 5.9
Other assistantship 20 5.6
*Respondents could select more than one type of funding/award.

NC State Experiences and Resources

All graduating seniors participating in the Future Plans Survey were asked about their participation in various work-related experiences, as well as about various career-related resources they might have used while at NC State. This section of the report summarizes the information they shared about these experiences.

Work-Related Experiences
Respondents were asked whether or not they had participated in various work-related experiences while a student at NC State, and if so, for how many semesters/summers they did it, and whether or not it was helpful in securing a job offer. Over half of the students reported having an internship or job related to their major (55%). A significant number of students also reported participating on a research project with a faculty member (20%), or on a class project specifically designed to work with a company/organization outside of NC State (22%).

The relatively small number of students having participated in co-op (6%) typically reported having multiple such experiences, with over half saying they had a co-op for either three (33%) or four or more (23%) semesters/summers. Research with faculty also tended to be a relatively long-term activity, with about one-third of those engaged in this activity doing so for three (14%) or four or more (20%) semesters/summers. Although most common, internships/jobs in academic field were generally more short-term. Forty-three percent of those doing an internship or having a job in their academic area had it for just one semester/summer, while 24 percent had it for two semesters/summers.

For the most part, regardless of the type of work-related experience, students who were interested in finding employment were very positive about the helpfulness of the experience in securing a job offer. Co-ops were most likely to be viewed as very helpful (68%) followed by internships/job in academic field (55%). About 40 percent of those participating in research with faculty or in student teaching found the experience to be very helpful in getting a job (42% and 40%, respectively). Least likely to be helpful in getting a job, according to those with such an experience, was a class project working with an outside company/organization. Twelve percent of those working on such a project said it was not at all helpful in securing a job, and another 21 percent said it was not very helpful.

Table 36: Participation in Work-Related Experiences*
Yes, participated # of semesters/summers participated
Participation in work-related experiences N % Less than 1 1 2 3 4+
Co-op 117 6.3% 2.6% 20.5% 20.5% 33.3% 23.1%
Internship/Job in Field 1,012 54.6% 4.1% 43.0% 23.9% 12.2% 16.9%
Practicum 64 3.5% 6.3% 73.0% 14.3% 1.6% 4.8%
Student Teaching 175 9.4% 0.6% 64.4% 18.4% 6.3% 10.3%
Research w/ Faculty 372 20.1% 2.7% 29.7% 33.0% 14.1% 20.5%
Class Project 415 22.4% 5.8% 60.2% 24.8% 3.4% 5.8%
Respondents could select more than one experience.

Table 37: Helpfulness of Work Experiences in Securing Employment (among those having had the experience and having looked for employment)
Mean 4: Very helpful 3: Somewhat helpful 2: Not very helpful 1: Not at all
helpful
Co-op (n=107) 3.54 68.2% 21.5% 6.5% 3.7%
Internship/Job in Field (n=903) 3.41 54.7% 34.4% 7.8% 3.1%
Practicum (n=53) 3.00 32.1% 41.5% 20.8% 5.7%
Student teaching (n=137) 3.15 40.1% 39.4% 16.1% 4.4%
Research w/ faculty (n=294) 3.15 41.5% 38.4% 13.3% 6.8%
Class project (n=353) 2.78 23.2% 43.6% 21.0% 12.2%

Career Service Offices
Graduating seniors were asked how frequently they had used the services of each of the different career service offices on campus, and, for those they had ever used, their evaluation of the services provided. While a majority of respondents (58%) said they had used the University Career Center, just 10 percent said they used it on a regular basis (3%) or many times (7%). Use of college-specific career service offices was, not surprising, lower among respondents overall. And, not surprisingly given their enrollment size relative to other colleges, respondents overall were most likely to have used the Poole College of Management Career Development Center and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) Career Services office.

Ratings of all career services offices were generally positive - - in no case did more than small number of users rate the services of any given center as poor or very poor. Users of the College of Textiles Career Services office were most likely to give it a positive rating, with 58 percent saying their services were excellent. One-third of those using the CALS Career Services offices rated their services as excellent (32%). Although still rated favorably as excellent or good by a majority of users, the Poole College of Management Career Development Center, the University Career Center, and the College of Design Career Services office were less likely than others to be rated as excellent by their users (24%, 21%, and 16%, respectively).

Table 38: Frequency of Use of Career Service Offices
5: On a regular
basis
4: Many times 3: Several times 2: Just once
or twice
1: Never
University Career Center 3.1% 6.6% 15.3% 33.5% 41.5%
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Career Services 1.0% 2.0% 5.2% 8.2% 83.7%
College of Textiles Career Services 1.5% 1.0% 1.7% 1.1% 94.6%
College of Design Career Services 0.2% 0.8% 0.8% 1.8% 96.4%
Poole College of Management Career Development Center 1.6% 3.4% 6.2% 8.2% 80.6%

Table 39: Rating of Career Offices' Services (among those ever having used the office)
Mean 5: Excellent 4: Good 3: Fair 2: Poor 1: Very Poor
University Career Center (n=1,063) 3.93 20.8% 55.0% 21.2% 2.7% 0.3%
CALS Career Services (n=288) 4.16 32.3% 52.1% 14.6% 1.0% 0.0%
College of Textiles Career Services (n=96) 4.46 58.3% 32.3% 7.3% 1.0% 1.0%
College of Design Career Services (n=62) 3.85 16.1% 58.1% 22.6% 1.6% 1.6%
Poole College of Management Career Development Center (n=345) 3.88 23.8% 48.4% 22.3% 3.5% 2.0%

Career Services and Fairs
Students were also asked whether or not they had used various specific career-related services. Almost three-fourths of respondents indicated that that had taken advantage of ePACK (72%), the University Career Center's online tool for connecting students with potential employers, and over half of the students said they had visited the University Career Center website (54%). About one-third of students said they had attended presentations about resume writing, interviewing, and other career skills (35%), that they had joined a professional society or organization at NC State related to their career field of interest (32%), and that they had attended employer information sessions (32%). Students were less likely to have participated in on-campus interviewing with potential employers (25%) or to have spoken with a Career Counselor/Coach (21%), and least likely to have participated in mock interviews with a Career Counselor/Coach (10%).

Two-thirds of those responding to the Future Plans Survey said they had attended a career fair, either on or off campus (65%). Again, given their relative enrollment size, it is perhaps not surprising that students having attended such a career fair were most likely to say they attended an Engineering Career Fair (41%) or the Poole College of Management Career and Internship Fair (26%). Few students mentioned attending a career fair not connected with NC State.

Table 40: Resources Used at NC State*
N %
ePACK 1335 72.0
Attended a career fair (either on or off campus) 1197 64.6
NC State University Career Center website 995 53.7
Presentations about resume writing, interviewing, and other career skills 641 34.6
Joined professional society/organization at NC State in career area 595 32.1
Employer information sessions 589 31.8
On-campus interviewing with potential employers 462 24.9
Spoke with Career Counselor/Coach 396 21.4
Mock interviews with Career Counselor/Coach 181 9.8
Respondents could select more than one resource.

Table 41: Career Fair Attended (among those having attended any type of career fair)*
N %
Engineering Career Fair 492 41.1
Poole College of Management Career & Internship Fair 314 26.2
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) Career Expo 203 17.0
College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHASS) Career Fair 125 10.4
Health Career Expo (at NC State) 69 5.8
(College of) Textiles Job Forum 66 5.5
Career fair not affiliated with a college/university 38 3.2
Law School Fair (at NC State) 33 2.8
Career fair at another college/university 25 2.1
College of Design Networking Fair 15 1.3
Other fair at NC State 101 8.4
Don't know/don't remember which one 26 2.2
Respondents could select more than one career fair.

Closing Comments

The Future Plans Survey closed by asking respondents to rate their overall satisfaction with the career guidance they had received from their department and/or college while at NC State, and to reflect on how they are feeling about their future career. The majority of Spring 2011 graduates said they were either satisfied (40%) or very satisfied (21%) with the career guidance they had received from their academic department/college. While a sizable number did not feel one way or the other about the guidance they received (30%), ten percent said they were either dissatisfied (7%) or very dissatisfied (3%) with it.

Overall, the Spring 2011 graduates are excited about their futures. When asked which statement comes closes to how they were feeling about their future, a plurality of respondents said they were very excited: I'm confident that this is what I want to do at this time and that I am adequately prepared for it (47%). Another 36 percent selected the option pretty excited: I'm fairly sure this is what I want to do at this time and that I'll be okay. Students were less likely to choose a bit confused/uncertain: I'm really not sure what I want to do and/or what I'm prepared to do (15%). Finally, very few students appear to be feeling at a loss, with just 2 percent selecting the final option, Very confused/uncertain: I just don't feel ready/prepared to move on.

Table 42: Satisfaction with Career Guidance from Academic Department/College
Mean 5: Very Satisfied 4: Satisfied 3: Neutral 2: Dissatisfied 1: Very Dissatisfied N
Overall satisfaction 3.69 20.8% 40.0% 29.5% 6.9% 2.9% 1,835

Table 43: Feelings about Future Career Path
N %
Very excited: Confident this is what I want to do and I'm prepared 869 47.3
Pretty excited: Fairly sure this is what I want to do 664 36.2
A bit confused/uncertain: Not really sure what I want to do 269 14.7
Very confused/uncertain: Don't feel ready/prepared to move on 34 1.9


For more information on the Spring 2011 Graduating Seniors' Future Plans Survey contact:
Dr. Nancy Whelchel, Associate Director for Survey Research
University Planning and Analysis
Box 7002
NCSU
Phone: (919) 515-4184
Email: Nancy_Whelchel@ncsu.edu

Posted: July, 2011

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